Tag Archives: Mobile

MTN’s “Unlimited” Limited Internet

I’ve been on the wrong side of various service providers as a result of my open expression of experiences while consuming services. It therefore came as a surprise when MTN Uganda called me up and requested that I try out the MTN Unlimited Internet Premium service.

Unlimited is a term that essentially means unrestricted, unconfined, boundless or infinite. So, in the real sense of the word, this service is not really unlimited. The package offers you internet access of upto 3 Gb on a daily basis. So, there is actually a limit only that it’s quite high for the average Joe to fully consume.

Being one with a mobile office, I rely a lot on mobile internet services to render my services. I must admit that I was one of those who were skeptical about this MTN offer until I tried it out.

In my days as a kid, I always demanded stuff like sweets from dad and mom whenever the opportunity presented itself. Today, my children demand data !!!! It is so serious that even when I claim not to have data, they mobilise resources among themselves and load a data package to see them through for a day or so. The kind of game apps they access can strain the regular data packages. This is another reason why I gladly wanted to test this service. How easy is it to deplete the 3Gb allotted daily?

I gave my family the challenge to deplete the daily allotted data and this meant unrestricted use of the internet. Where I used to limit them watching videos and TV shows online, this time round, they had a blank slate. They could hardly believe their ears. We all tried and worked towards this feat without success.

My initial observations show that it’s an always on service with much less downtime than my traditional data provider.

Consuming 3Gb of data is no mean feat especially if you’re not the type to always be at the computer. I tried watching all sorts of videos, encouraged my children to play online games, watch online study lessons, chose to upgrade software but alas, still failed.

This data service works well for urban connectivity, however, in rural settings, there are still challenges. I’m writing this article on a sojourn in Butaleja district and have had to do without internet while in my gardens and at home. Most urban dwellers can do with just about any service provider since their services are usually decent in such locations. It takes one a journey to rural locales to establish whether your data service is worth its salt. MTN Uganda has to find ways of improving 3G coverage nationwide.

There has always been this talk of lost data and I blogged about it before. It’s still a big problem apparently. I can authoritatively state that six (6) out of ten people I have interacted with have complaints about unexplained data loss. As a matter of fact, I personally transitioned from buying monthly data bundles to daily ones simply because of the ease of monitoring my data consumption. Imagine loading 1Gb of data for a month and by the third day it’s finished.

If you’re a power user and want to save yourself the data loss gymnastics, then I strongly believe opting for this “Unlimited” MTN Service is ideal. The cost of UGX 330,000/= monthly for the Premium option however leaves me wondering whether it is pocket friendly enough. However, there is the Basic option that goes for UGX 179,000/=. Maybe, I will consider subscribing for the latter.

Overall, my experience tells me, the MTN “Unlimited” Internet is worth having for the internet savvy.

James Wire is a Small Business and Technology Consultant based in Kampala, Uganda

Follow @wirejames on Twitter.

Email lunghabo [at] gmail [dot] com

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HOW TO – Start a Mobile Money Business

Mobile Money (MM) is a form of electronic money service that enables phone owners send, receive and store money. The relative safety, ease of mobility and convenient nature of this service has endeared it to all sections of the society from the rich to the poor.

Before we proceed, it is important that we familiarise ourselves with some terminologies.

Agent: A person or business that is contracted to facilitate transactions for users. The most important of these are cash-in and cash-out (i.e loading and withdrawing money onto/from the MM system). They sometimes register new users, a service that earns them extra commission. As front line personnel, they also teach users how to best use the service.

mobile_money_agent

A Mobile Money agent in Kyebando, Kampala, Uganda

Aggregator: A person or business that is responsible for recruiting new MM agents. This role is sometimes combined with that of a Master Agent.

E-Money: Known as Electronic money in full. It is stored value held in the accounts of users, agents and the provider of the MM service.

Cash In: The process by which a customer credits their account with cash. This is done usually via an Agent who receives the cash and proceeds to credit the customer’s MM account.

Cash Out: The process by which a customer withdraws cash from their MM account. It is done usually by an Agent who gives the customer cash equivalent to a transfer the customer makes to the Agent’s MM line.

Float: The balance of e-money or physical cash that an agent can immediately access to meet customer demands to purchase or sell e-money.

Liquidity: The ability of an agent to meet customers’ demands to purchase (cash-in) or sell (cash-out) e-money.

MasterAgent: A person or business that purchases e-money from a Mobile Network Operator wholesale and then resells it to agents who in turn resell it to users. They usually manage the cash and e-money liquidity of their agents.

Mobile Money Transfer: A movement of value that is made from a mobile money account to another through the use of a mobile phone.

Platform: The hardware and software that enables the provision of a mobile money service.

In Uganda, the Mobile Money system works as follows;

The Mobile Network Operator (MNO) like MTN, Africell and Airtel sets up a platform that offers a service for phone owners to be able to “store and transfer” e-money using their phones.

A phone owner registers for the mobile money service with the telecommunications provider who creates the mobile money account associated with that particular registered phone number.

The customer then proceeds to cach-in onto their mobile money account by using a Mobile Money agent whom they give cash in exchange for e-money on the Mobile Money account.

This customer can through the execution of some commands send e-money to another mobile money account holder anytime they so wish. The recipient is at liberty to cash-out as and when they desire.

Just to show you how Mobile Money services have permeated our economy and become an integral part of our operations, picture the following scenarios;

  • Oloya works in Kampala and is constructing a house in the village. Every two days he is expected to pay for the services of the builders. By using MM, he is able to pay each builder directly onto their phone hence being assured of their commitment.

  • Nankabirwa is a produce dealer who has a network of buyers traversing numerous villages in Rakai, Masaka and other outlying districts. Their role is to identify produce for purchase and acquire it. By using MM, she is able to send money to these buyers of hers in the nick of time. She makes at least eight transfers daily during the peak harvesting season.

  • Pabire a rice farmer in Doho rice scheme by virtue of his mobility utilises MM transfers to pay for his workers’ services. These workers engage in activities like planting and weeding rice, land preparation, harvesting among others. This allows work to flow smoothly even in his absence.

  • Bakka leaves home for work fully knowing that there is no money for food that day. When he reaches his workplace (a washing bay), he transfers his income from washing the first three cars of the day to his wife at home using MM. Come evening, he is assured of finding food at home.

  • Sangalo is organising a wedding and she has reached out to relatives and friends to fundraise. The mode of pledge fulfillment being used is MM. Those contributing are sending their cash pledges directly onto her Mobile Money account.

  • Mugerwa, a parent at one of the boarding secondary schools is called by his son who reminds him about the study tour they are supposed to go for requiring a contribution of UGX 50,000/= per student. Instead of driving there to make payment, he simply sends th money via MM to the concerned teacher who then registers his son for the trip.

  • One can also pay for electricity, water, television and other services using Mobile Money.

So, how does one start this business as an Agent?

You need to have the following basics:

  • Two sim cards (Airtel and MTN). They are the biggest networks and handle at least 98% of the transactions. Others like Africell are still insignificant players.

  • Display Table. You need to have a display table that will not only store the tools of your trade but it can be stocked with other complementary products like mobile phones, accessories like phone jackets, screen protectors among others.

  • A dual sim card phone

  • A chair

  • Transaction books

  • Location

There are three approaches one can use to kick off. They are;

  1. Hiring a Transaction Line: This one involves hiring an already registered Mobile Money transaction line from someone or a company. With this line, you simply start off business without going through any registration hurdles. The things to note about this option include among others:

    • Paying a monthly rental fee of at least UGX 50,000/= for the MM line.

    • Income is in the form of a percentage commission earned on each transaction and is paid at the end of the month.

  1. Acquiring a Transaction Line through an Aggregator or Master Agent: Aggregators or Master Agents are companies that control specific territory on behalf of the Mobile Network Operators. Territories could include places like Kyebando, Kanyanya, Nakawa, Seeta, Bweyogerere e.t.c. These Master Agents get agency tenders through some bidding process and thereafter become responsible for licensing MM agents in their territories. For one to be licensed as an agent, you need to:

    • Present an Identity Card

    • Present a letter of introduction/recommendation from the Local Council

    • Have a deposit of UGX 80,000/= (Eighty Thousand Shillings) to purchase the kit

    • Fill in an application form

    • Have starting Float of UGX 2,000,000/= (Two Million shillings)

Income earned here is in form of commission on transactions. An additional surcharge of upto 10% (depending on the Master Agent) of your income is deducted for tax to the Uganda Revenue Authority.

  1. Direct Registration with a Mobile Network Operator (MNO): One is at liberty to register as an agent directly with an MNO like MTN or Airtel. Its requirements are more than the previous two options and they include:

    • Business Registration

    • Introduction/Recommendation letter from the Local Council

    • Functional bank account (for at least three months)

    • Filled application forms

    • An 80,000/= (Eighty Thousand Shillings) charge for the kit

    • Initial Float of UGX 2,000,000/= (Two Million Shillings) only.

Like the rest, income earned is in form of commission made on the transactions carried out. Unlike option 2 (two) above, with this form of registration, you are only charged the tax levy for Uganda Revenue Authority when your commission earnings exceed the UGX 1 Million Shillings threshold. The MNO then proceeds to deduct 4% which it channels to the tax man as opposed to the 10% deduction by Master Agents. This is definitely a better deal.

Option 1 is as instant as they get. If you want to hit the ground running, you may opt for this one. However, the margins are greatly reduced by the fact that you hire a Transaction line at a fixed monthly sum and because you are operating under another Agent, your margins are lower.

In the case of Options 2 and 3, After application and paying the UGX 80,000/= for the kit, you have to wait for two to three months prior to being approved as an agent. Once that is done, an Agent kit is availed and it consists of; three (3) phone lines, a phone handset, transaction books and other branding material like an apron.

Upon collection of this kit, you’re expected to deposit a float of UGX 2,000,000/= (two million shillings) on your Mobile Money line. Do I see you getting disheartened? True, raising this two million shillings lumpsome is a daunting task to many but there is always a way out. One trick is to borrow that money for a day, place it onto the MM line as float subject to approval and collection of your business material from the Master Agent or MNO. Once you have all that you need, proceed to cash out the borrowed money and return it to the lender.

How do you earn commission?

There is a well established commission structure clearly outlined by each MNO.

Airtel Agent’s Commission Guide (Extract)

Transaction Tiers

Cash In

Cash Out

Min

Max

500

2,500

150

100

2,501

5,000

150

125

5,001

15,000

285

450

125,001

250,000

520

1,300

1,000,001

2,000,000

4500

7,500

When a customer walks in and requests to deposit e-money onto their MM account, depending on the amount, you earn the commensurate Cash-In amount. If it is UGX 10,000/= they are depositing, then the agent will receive a cash-in of UGX 285/= on that transaction. Similarly, the Cash-Out commission applies to money withdrawals from the MM account.

Airtel does allow agents to check their commission status on a daily basis via the phone. However, the same does not seem to be true with MTN Uganda.

Success Factors for the Moble Money Agent business

  1. Trustworthiness: If you have to employ someone to operate this business on your behalf, you need to be able to trust them Anything short of that, you’re setting yourself up for failure. There are very many opportunities that these workers get to collude with crooks.

  2. Location: It is crucial to choose a location that is good. Since the commission on individual transactions looks small, the trick lies in volumes. How many transactions can you notch up a day? Ideal locations are corners of buildings or roads, boda-boda stages, busy trading centres, low cost residential suburbs, shopping arcades, taxi parks/stages among others.

    mm_corner

    A corner location like this one is very conducive for the Mobile Money business

  3. Customer Care: Many customers are ignorant about the operation of the Mobile Money services. They tend to ask questions one may consider dumb hence the need for any agent to have very good customer care skills. While researching for this article, I found agents being swamped by customers who wanted help with Sim Card verification. Imagine!!! Do not compromise on this particular issue when recruiting someone for your business.

    mm_operator

    Good customer care is dependent on the Mobile Money operator

  4. Mathematical Knowledge: The operator needs to have good mental maths skills. Customers come with all manner of requests and you need to be quick to mentally calculate and determine how much to transfer as requested. I witnessed a case where a lady came and requested the operator to cash out money from her account which has UGX 15,000/= (fifteen thousand) and ensure that it remains with only UGX 6,000/= (six thousand). He had to ensure that the transaction fees were factored in too. The operator had to first engage in some quick mental math before eventually fulfilling her request.

  5. Float Availability: How much do you have as e-money or cash? Customers keep walking in and out either cashing in or cashing out. You need to be in position to meet their needs most of the times otherwise they are likely to resort to the competition. I once had a need to cash-out UGX 300,000/=. I walked to three different MM agents in Wandegeya and none could meet my need. Out of frustration, I settled for partial cash-outs based on the float each agent had and this saw me use four different agents to meet my need. Since then, I never go to Wandegeya for MM cash-outs. Remember, if you set a reputation of always having adequate float, more customers patronise your services thereby enriching you commission-wise.

What are some of the notable challenges of this lucrative business?

  • Conmen: There are many conmen on the loose who target MM agents. Any form of sloppiness can lead to severe punishment. There was a case of a man who pulled up his sleek car infront of the agent’s display table, requested her to transfer UGX 450,000/=. She faithfully yielded as he pretended to count some money. The minute he confirmed reception of the money, he simply drove off leaving her stranded.

Most sophisticated conmen have been observed to operate from the city centre locations. So, in case you’re starting out, as you gain the experience, try to operate from the suburbs first.

  • Theft: Due to the carelessness of some agents, there cases of customers whose sole intention of patronising your service is to get to know the PIN number used to access the MM line. Most times agents type in the PIN number in full view of the customers. What the crooks then do is to later return and find a way of stealing the phone handset. Within minutes, they have withdrawn all the money and discarded the phone.

  • Cash Robbery: There are cases where an Agent has to bank the money earned. Sometimes due to late business closure, they might have to go home with the earned cash. Depending on how secretively one handles their operations, thugs tend to get wind of your earnings and simply way lay you.

  • Attention to detail: A customer once walked to an agent and requested to cash-in UGX 99,000/= (Ninety Nine thousand shillings). The agent instead punched UGX 990,000/= (Nine hundred and ninety thousand shillings). The customer paid up and left. During the evening reconciliation, she realised there was a massive shortfall and upon close scrutiny, the anomaly was discovered. It took a week of negotiations and a 100km journey to Masaka from Kampala for the money to be recovered.

  • Collusion: Some staff running the MM outlets have a tendency of conniving with other people to defraud their employer. They then feign ignorance or put the blame on mistakes.

Just to give you an idea, earnings can start from as low as UGX 50,000/= (fifty thousand shillings) per line per month with start-up Float of UGX 500,000/= (Five hundred thousand shillings) reaching an average of UGX 1,000,000/= (one million shillings) with a float of UGX 3,000,000/= (Three Million shillings).

The monthly pay for Mobile Money Operators ranges between UGX 100,000/= and UGX 150,000/=.

While offering the MM services, always consider selling complimentary products like Airtime, Flash disks, Memory cards among others. Airtime commissions can very easily supplement your income too. The current commission structure on airtime of UGX 10,000/= (ten thousand shillings) is as follows:

MNO

% Commission

MTN Uganda

4%

Airtel

5%

Africell

7%

Welcome to the Mobile Money Business.

James Wire is a Small Business and Technology Consultant based in Kampala, Uganda

Follow @wirejames on Twitter.

Email lunghabo [at] gmail [dot] com

Other Articles of Interest:

Additional information from GSMA – Mobile Money for the unbanked.

He Died!! Where did his Mobile Money go?

On his way home from work, he hired a bodaboda to help him swiftly navigate the traffic jam only to get involved in a nasty accident that saw him lose his life. Charlie (name not real), was an ambitious young man who was out to curve a better world for himself. In his business, he used a lot of Mobile Money (MM) transactions since they offered a lot of flexibility and security. When he died, no one knew about the financial status of his MM account nor his pin code. Not even his wife!!!

Such scenarios are common in Uganda. People die, lose phones with their simcards or travel out of the country only to return years later and the Mobile Money is no longer available.

Where does this Mobile Money go? This is the key question.

It is typical of the telecom companies in Uganda to reassign phone numbers that have not been in use for a while. This re-assignment is done in such a manner that any Mobile Money that was on that account gets erased too. I have a sim card from Airtel and once, due to a long period of inactivity, it was deactivated. Before the deactivation, I had deposited UGX 20,000/= on the Moble Money. Upon reactivation, when I inquired about the MM, all I was told was that I had to register afresh. No explanation was given for the absence of my MM previously deposited.

Imagine a telecom deactivating at least 300 sim cards per day. Of those, let’s say 50% have Mobile Money leftovers that average out to UGX 20,000/= on their individual accounts. This gives a total of UGX 3,000,000/= (Three Million) daily being taken over by the Telecoms company. In a month, this works out to UGX 90,000,000/= (Ninety Million) and a year, that adds up to a conservative estimate of UGX 1,080,000,000/= (One billion, eighty million).

This may not look like much money to the telecom company but a quick analysis reveals that it can pay the annual salaries of at least ten middle level managers with each earning in the region of Eight to Nine Million shillings. This same amount can be used to pay up for the lease on the cars used by the telecom.

While appearing as a small loss on the part of the customer, this money when aggregated becomes massive and this is where the telecom companies benefit unscrupulously.

In another scenario, someone deposits UGX 1,000,000/= (One Million) onto the MM account and does not use it for a period of two weeks. The telecom company earns interest off that money but the customer is only entitled to the principal amount deposited. This is another ugly scar rearing its head in the MM field. Every day, you have Billions of Shillings deposited onto the Mobile Money systems and they earn a hefty sum for the Telecoms companies even if they remain unused for a mere few days. Is it fair that the status-quo continues? Isn’t it time the consumer was given their due?

Well, some telecoms have come up with a spinoff savings scheme using MM but that is like dragging wool over our eyes as clients. Whether I enroll for the savings scheme or not, for as long as I have my Mobile Money on the phone, it is prudent that any interest earned by the telco be passed on to me too (at least a fraction).

Currently there is no serious modality when it comes to regulation of Mobile Money. Like loan sharks, the players set their rules and determine how the game is played. Apart from the requirement by the Central Bank for the Telcos to have bank accounts that backup the electronic money with actual cash reserves, there is nothing more. When MTN suffered an internal MM fraud setback some years back, it was a result of system manipulation that led to issuing of more electronic money than the actual bank reserves had.

In this era as we transition from paper to digital money, it is prudent that the Bank of Uganda wakes up to its responsibility. They need to move swiftly with the times, work with the Uganda Communications Commission and any other parties to ensure that we have a fair and forward looking environment that will see a greater adoption of MM.

Digital Money is a reality we are faced with and have to ready ourselves to embrace it fully.

James Wire is a Small Business and Technology Consultant based in Kampala, Uganda

Follow @wirejames on Twitter

Free MyUG WiFi? Kifeesi to go Online

Kifeesi is a renowned criminal gang in Kampala city that has baffled the minds of many. Their daring moves at carrying out broad day light robberies in the busy downtown spots without fear of the law enforcement officers have raised many eye brows. Like the ruthless Mungiki of Kenya, Kifeesi could easily be rated as a younger sibling or rather a Mungiki wannabe. NBS Tv did a good investigation on this gang here.

kifeesi

Kifeesi Criminals arrested. Courtesy picture from Eagle Online

Crime is crime. A criminal mind is always ready to operate anywhere for as long as the terrain is conducive. The recent announcement by the Minister of Information Communication Technology and National Guidance about the free offer of WiFi internet access in Kampala has been met with mixed opinions. Many urban dwelling Ugandans have taken on the use of the internet with a lot of zeal over the past five years. Facebook and WhatsApp seem to have the lion’s share of activity. Free WiFi is seen as “manna from heaven.”

unnamed-2Accessing the free WiFi in Kampala entails being within an area that has the signal hence allowing your phone or mobile gadget to connect. The hotspots have been spread in certain locations for starters with others to follow suit later. As a first time user, you are expected to submit some profile information and then get access thereafter. In keeping with the expectations of Hon. Father Lokodo the State Minister for Ethics and Integrity, no pornography shall be accessible.

Now to Kifeesi. I foresee a re-invention of Kifeesi as this WiFi takes root. A Kifeesi that will no longer be content about merely stealing your phone or robbing you of that pocket change. This Kifeesi is IT savvy. Their goal is to either;

  • Steal your online identity or

  • Con your online friends or

  • Rob your bank account or

  • Blackmail you or

  • Settle scores

How is the new Kifeesi likely to do it?

By identifying a public area that people frequent to access free WiFi, all they need to do is set up rogue WiFi hotspots that have eerily similar names like those of the official HotSpot provider. If the HotSpots by NITA-U are named MyUG (for example’s sake), Kifeesi can setup MyUG1 and then link that hotspot to the internet.

The unsuspecting public will innocently hook onto that hotspot and start chatting away using all sorts of social media utilities (encrypted and unencrypted). Before you know it, you’re availing Kifeesi a lot of information about yourself and others you interact with. What they do with that information is dependent on how much they are willing to go after you. Your login credentials to access various online services can easily be harvested and either sold on the online blackmarket or even used to rob you or endanger others.

Kifeesi Victim

Let us take the case of a one Natabo. She works for a leading bank and is a top level manager. She gets duped into using the Kifeesi WiFi. She quickly gets into her Facebook account, Instagram, Twitter and WhatsApp. As she interacts with her online community of friends, the Kifeesi hotspot is logging all her traffic to and from the internet while diverting it to a separate location for further analysis. After a “nice” time chatting online, she chooses to check her bank email before leaving and this involves logging into the system. Again, her information is logged.

This is phase one for Kifeesi and so far, some success has been registered. Now is the time to go to the next step.

Kifeesi in Action

With basic tools got online, the Kifeesi crew sifts through Natabo’s data and extracts all sorts of unencrypted information that it uses to build a profile of who she is. With sniffed logins and passwords, they are able to undertake further access to her numerous online accounts. The killer comes in when they access her bank email. There-in lies confidential corporate data on various key client accounts as well as the internal workings of the bank.

Kifeesi Next Steps

With the gathered credentials so far, Kifeesi can choose to trade the confidential bank information got from her email to the competition. This is one of the ways industrial espionage takes place of late.

Natabo’s friends can be duped using the various social media accounts into undertaking certain financial transactions under the guise of dealing with her.

Natabo’s secret chats, photo exchanges among others could easily be used to blackmail her into paying a ransom to Kifeesi or else she faces tabloid exposure.

Natabo’s friends could be lured into appointments that could endanger them. The end result would be robbery or even physical harm like rape.

And much more.

Exercise Caution

As you spring out to partake of the free MyUG WiFi, exercise caution. Do not just log onto any hotspot that remotely resembles the official hotspots in name. Ensure that you carefully study the WiFi to be connected to. This will reduce on your level of susceptibility to fraud.

By doing that, you and me can manage the emerging online Kifeesi.

Follow @wirejames on Twitter

When Ugandans were fooled into SIM Registration

They huffed and puffed, talked about all the reasons why all Ugandans MUST register their sim cards. Security was put at the forefront and we were promised how this registration would be the silver bullet towards phone related crimes. A few of us may not have believed the entire package of promises being made but the majority did believe and responded accordingly. Read More here …

SIM Card Registration? Stop the Nonsense!!

Another deadline looms, SIM card registration has become a cat and mouse game in Uganda. The Ministry of ICT (MoICT) made a public communication in 2012 announcing the commencement of this process and this was done hand in hand with the Uganda Communications Commission (UCC). On its website, the MoICT clearly stated; “Do not wait for the habitual last minute rush! The only person who should be afraid of SIM registration, naturally, is the criminally-minded who knows that their days are numbered after all existing SIM Cards are registered. Therefore, join the winning team by registering your SIM at the nearest registration centre.”

Fast forward to February 2013 as the original deadline was round the corner, Phone Subscribers and Telecoms companies were up in arms claiming that they were not in position to register all their subscribers due to lack of ample time to do so. They also cited reasons like the challenges of reaching out to the rural areas where a significant number of subscribers exists and potential loss of revenue. The UCC caved in and accepted an extension.

I was one of those that attended a consultative meeting by UCC prior to the previous deadline in which I clearly stated that they should not cave in to pressure from the Telcos and Subscribers since it is a typical Ugandan attitude of always expecting nothing to fall through as panned. I even prophesied that irrespective of the extension given, we would have a repeat of the same cries come the revised deadline.

Its now May 2013 and the deadline is due once again. We are seeing a repeat of the same games the Telecoms in Uganda have become accustomed to playing as evidenced in this article by the Daily Monitor. The Corporate Affairs Manager of MTN, Ms. Justina Ntabgoba is quoted as saying “We still have close to 15 percent of our customers yet to register.”

In my honest view, this is utter hogwash. The telecoms are looking at this issue from the lens of revenue while UCC is looking at it from the lens of security. These two just will never converge and the call is for the regulator to make the tough but wise decision.

Mr. Fred Otunnu of UCC was quoted by the Observer Newspaper as saying that the extended registration deadline would not be changed. This is the time now to see who lives by their word. The UCC has always been accused of being feeble when it comes to pertinent issues and decisive when it comes to issues that ruffle Statehouse as evidenced with the ‘Walk to Work’ protests in 2011.

Mr. Mutabazi and your team, its time to prove to Ugandans that you are not the spineless lot that you have been depicted to be at UCC. Any stay of this decision beyond this year will mean battling it out with the myopically minded politicians who will turn the issue political. Their lazy constituents will send threats of voting them out of power if they don’t stop SIM card Registration and that’s when the real fun will begin.

I love Uganda.